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The 100-Year Life project

The 100-Year Life project

The 100 Year Life Project will exploit and advance the role of design research in enabling older people to lead longer, more productive lives – the longevity effect. Lab4Living has been awarded funding by Research England through their Expanding Excellence in England (E3) fund to support the strategic expansion of research in this area.

Funded by: Research England


Due to higher life expectancies the number of people expected to live to be 100 will increase significantly by 2066. The changing demographics and structure of the population will bring many challenges to society, the economy and services. However this will bring new opportunities for the emergence of new markets, increased involvement in volunteering, longer working lives and possibly providing care for family members. Individuals will need to plan their life and retirement differently with existing ideas of ageing being replaced with models of a multi-stage 100 year life (birth, education, work, education, training, work, career break, education and training).

Age related products, new housing models and care technologies which enable older people to lead more independent fulfilled lives will be considered within this project answering questions on what these products are, how multi-sectorial groups of people will work together, what standards and quality assurances are required for these products and services  and how this knowledge is shared across sectors.

“One in three children born in the UK today can expect to live to be 100 – and by 2066 one in two children will reach this milestone. We need to look at what this expanded life-span will mean for where and how people live; what products will they use; what the implications are for health care, communities, and, of course, the home.”

Prof Paul Chamberlain

Focusing on informing the scale and scope of the Future Home, the project will generate ideas for new aspirational products, protocols and interventions which meet the physical, cognitive and emotional needs of an ageing population within the Future Home.

Related news:

For more information, please contact Julie Roe, Project Manager E3, Lab4Living.

The Life Café

The Design to Care Programme seeks to rethink how palliative and end of life care can be provided equitably, efficiently and sustainably for future generations. The Life Café Kit is a result of the programme, and is designed to promote and support conversations about what individuals find meaningful in life and in care. For more information visit www.lifecafe.org.uk

Funded by Marie Curie
Partnered with University of Cambridge

Team: Helen Fisher, Claire Craig, Paul Chamberlain

Drawing on long-established ethical principles, the UK General Medical Council articulates good end of life care as that which ‘helps patients with life-limiting conditions to live as well as possible until they die and to die with dignity’ (GMC 2009 p.3).

The last decade has witnessed a demographic change on unprecedented scale.

People are living longer and with more complex, long term conditions such as cancer and dementia. Our palliative and end of life care services will be required to meet the needs of our ageing population under increasing pressure.

The Life Café is one of the outputs of the Design to Care programme which seeks to rethink how palliative and end of life care can be provided equitably, efficiently and sustainably for future generations.

The community engagement aspect of the Design to Care programme focuses on understanding what is important to different individuals in life, in care, and towards end of life. A methodology has been developed by researchers at Sheffield Hallam University’s Lab4Living, to enable research to be gathered in an informal, comfortable manner within existing community groups and familiar environments. This has been named the Life Café.

“This has made an incredible difference to me today to share these things and listen to you all.”

Life Café Participant

“Good care is ‘talking, listening, communicating, trusting, consistency, choice and time.”

Life Café Participant 

Taking the method of ‘exhibition in a box’, a form of object elicitation developed by Chamberlain and Craig (2013) as the starting point, this study curated a series of creative activities, to scaffold thinking and to prompt conversation. The Life Café is comprised of a variety of critical artefacts, activities and resources, co-developed with community members, that have been used to gather stories, experiences and ideas to support the design phase of the project. 

Our iterative methodology of using resources and artefacts, analysing data, generating themes, then modifying the resources has been a form of behind-the-scenes co-design. Participants have shaped the contents of the Life Cafe and enabled others to talk about sensitive topics more easily, without really realizing. This iterative co-design process has occurred through every element, activity and resource included in the Life Café Kit, even the graphic design and the packaging design.

11 Life Cafés facilitated 141 participants 

In the first phase of the Design to Care Programme, 11 Life Cafés have been facilitated with a total of 141 participants (from groups including chaplains, faith groups, coffee morning socials and mixed community groups), using convenience sampling. 

The Life Café Kit

Life Cafés were continued to develop a kit for independent facilitation. The life café has since been independently facilitated within 2 community groups, a care home and a hospice. The feedback from this will be consolidated and incorporated into the final version of the Kit. We have increasing interest in the Life Café Kit, not only for community groups but for use in schools, carer groups, staff training etc. to open the conversation up and bring awareness to organisations.

The Life Café as a method of eliciting the experiences of individuals in the context of meaning and care has been very successful. Particularly notable was its ability to enable community groups through this process to identify strength and mobilise knowledge and action. This sits well in the context of building compassionate communities.

The Life Café has elicited insights into how individuals conceptualise and describe good care, and a recognition of the pressure points in relation to delivery. The research offers glimpses of what better care might and could look like in the future. Future research will continue to utilise this method with other groups (health and social care staff, trusts and CCGs, carer groups, community groups etc.) to continue to build understanding in order to inform the redesign of end of life care provision. For more information or to order a Life Cafe Kit please visit www.lifecafe.org.uk.

Resources

Related research on Sheffield Hallam University’s Research Archive

GRIP: Developing an education resource for people with Low back pain.

This project, funded through the Getting Research into Practice (GRIP) programme, used co-production and creative methods to inform the design of an educational resource for people with lower back pain in Sheffield.

Funded by:
Getting Research into Practice (GRIP) funding programme through National Institute for Health Research Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR CLAHRC YH).

Team:
Rebecca Partridge

Partners:
Rick Webber – specialist physiotherapist, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
Cheryl Grindell- Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

Current UK NICE low back pain guidance recommends patient education to improve self-management, however current evidence on how best to provide this education is unclear. Beliefs associated with a traditional biomedical view of lower back pain can

be a barrier to recovery.
Education that helps people reframe their problem as complex and multifactorial may help patients accept and engage with more positive attitudes and behaviours. Passive information rarely leads to these behaviours.

The creative co-design process applied in this project provided a different approach to the traditional top down method of research and intervention development. It encouraged a collaborative problem-solving approach and fostered a non-hierarchical inclusive approach to knowledge mobilisation.


Stakeholders involved

CLAHRC- SY
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS foundation Trust
Physioworks Sheffield

 


Methods used

To develop the education resource, service users and providers were brought together in two co-production workshops. In the first workshop, we explored the lived experience of back pain. Participants were invited to share their experiences to generate a shared understanding of the complexities of living with and managing back pain.

The second workshop focused on idea generation to support and manage some of the complexities highlighted in the previous workshop. From these ideas, a series of prototypes were developed and tested within Sheffield Physio works.


Project Outcome

New educational resources were developed and have now been implemented within Physio works, Sheffield. The resources include a patient workbook and a series of information leaflets. All these resources are available physically and online.

As a result of patient feedback during the workshop, an improved interactive education session was developed to align to the new resources.


Parkinson’s services in the South West Peninsula

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a highly complex progressive neurodegenerative disease. Individuals experience PD in  a wide variety of ways, leading to difficulty in diagnosis, acceptance and on-going management. Service provision is complex and varied depending on provider. This project utilised a participatory design methodology to identify patient and provider needs for PD services in the South West Peninsula. Then used co-design to develop tools, resources and service structures to meet these.

Funded by : 
Bial Pharmaceuticals
University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Foundation Trust
Sheffield Hallam University

Partners:
University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Foundation Trust
Sheffield Hallam University
Livewell Southwest
People living with Parkinson’s Disease and their family’s/carers
Parkinson’s UK

Project team:
Joe Langley
Rebecca Partridge



Parkinson’s occurs when a small group of nerve cells in the brain no longer produce enough dopamine. This is a chemical that transmits messages from the brain to other parts of the body, enabling people to perform smooth, coordinated movements. Insufficient dopamine messes up these transmissions. Although typically associated with tremors, muscle stiffness and slower movements, it is also associated with a wide range of other symptoms including nightmares and night sweats, hallucinations, reduced facial expressions, depression, loss of taste and smell and ‘freezing’ (where someone suffers a temporary lack of ability to take a step, speak or communicate).

This highly individualised experience leads to difficulty in diagnosis, acceptance and on-going management. There is currently no cure for Parkinson’s so symptoms are managed through a combination of drugs and self-management (exercise, sleep hygiene etc.). The first year following diagnosis is involves many different healthcare professionals such as; Speech and Language Therapists, Dietitian’s, Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, a Parkinson’s Nurse Specialist and Neurology Specialist Consultants.

The provision of Parkinson’s services is complex and varied depending on provider. Services in the South West Peninsula cover acute and community settings, cross multiple regional and budgetary boundaries, cover a large geographical and rural area and have staffing pressures from unfulfilled roles, long term sick leave and increased patient numbers.

Participants in workshop three exploring what could be different with information provision.

This project has had a different approach and an interactive style. It’s made me work with people who I would not normally interact with, we have worked with patients and their families. They have been at the heart of everything we have discussed and addressed. It’s been genuine co-design with patients.

Staff member, Sw peninsula parkinson’s service

Participants

  • People living with Parkinson’s and their families and carers
  • Parkinson’s Specialist Nurses
  • Community care teams
  • Therapy Specialists
  • Consultant Neurologists
  • Finance officer
  • Parkinson’s UK Charity representative

To improve the patient and staff experiences of using and delivering services in the South West Peninsula, this project utilised a participatory design methodology to identify patient and provider needs and generate a series of solutions to these needs. A wide range of design research techniques were implemented that included; Lego® Serious Play®, Persona creation, Service Mapping and Prototyping.

Five full day workshops explored

  • What are staff and user experiences?
  • How is the service currently run?
  • What could be different?
  • Idea development
  • Prototyping and Testing


Outcomes

As a result of these workshops, five concepts are currently in development: A Parkinson’s Patient passport; New service and local information; a media campaign; a card deck to support therapeutic sessions; a self-management support and general information package. In addition further funding has been secured through The health Foundation to progress the development of a Home based Parkinson’s care service.

Parkinson’s passport Prototype

I’ve really enjoyed the exposure to different methods and ideas to support creative thinking. It’s challenged me to think outside the box

Person living with Parkinson’s
Information on Demand Prototype

An evaluation is currently being undertaken with participants from both sites to explore whether there was a difference in the experience and impact between wards engaged in the creative practice and co- design of the critical artefacts in comparison to the ward that was not. It will reflect on  how the artefacts had been utilised and any possible strategies that the wards have found useful in relation to identifying and implementing positive deviant behaviours