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Latest News

 
What’s On in the White Building: FUTURE US pop-up exhibition and Obstetric Airways Trainer

This month, in the exhibition side of our space in the White Building, we are hosting FUTURE US, a pop-up exhibition for a Bio Design Challenge project with MA Design students.

In the windows, you can see some example prototypes from the Obstetric Airways Trainer project with anaesthetists at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. Designer Andy Stanton is working on a prototype obstetric airway management training tool for use in anaesthetist training.

FUTURE US

FUTURE US is a pop-up exhibition presenting the projects developed for the Bio Design Challenge by 1st year MA design students from Sheffield Hallam University, hosted by Lab4Living in the White Building on the 19th May from 5-9pm.

The exhibition invites you on a speculative journey about the human future, challenging you to rethink and reinvent the interplay between humans, nature, and technology.

As the world becomes more and more complex through; the rapid progression of technology, the accelerated breakthrough of science, and the increasing vulnerability of the natural environment, we have to reassess our lifestyle, mindset, and identity.

In the exhibition, you will discover three diverse speculative and disruptive scenarios:

Future Us pop up exhibition
  • One will emotionally provoke you to reconsider your connection with your pet, ethically challenging the future relationship between humans and non-humans. 
  • Another one proposes a dark, underground, and unexpected service to design babies, deeply questioning bio-data privacy through time. 
  • The final one acts as a wake-up call confronting over-built cities far from nature with an activist organisation breaking down buildings with the help of nature.

The speculative nature of the three projects allows you to think from a different perspective. With a stimulated imagination, we can easily debate current societal issues such as animal welfare, ethics, data privacy, genetic manipulation, waste, and pollution.

This exhibition acts as a space to dream, debate, provoke and think.

The projects were supervised and supported by Noémie Soula and Daz Richardson (https://www.biodesignchallenge.org/sheffield-hallam-university-2022)

Book your tickets here (optional): https://www.eventbrite.com/e/biodesign-challenge-tickets-334438423327

Exhibition details

  • Exhibition details: Thursday 19th May at The White Building, Fitzalan Square, Sheffield S1 2AZ
  • Opening times: 5-9pm. Light refreshments from 5pm – 7pm.
  • Related events: Future Now festival of creativity

What’s in the Window?

Obstetric Airways Trainer prototypes

We’ve been working with anaesthetists at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals on a prototype obstetric airway management training tool. Women requiring emergency ventilation (intubation) during childbirth can have different and changing needs which are not met in current training tools (based on adult males or children) used for training anaesthetists.

By building in interchangeable functionality, the design team has produced a training mannequin which can provides more realistic intubation training for the next generation of anaesthetists.

Obstetric Airways Trainer prototypes on display in the White Building
Plinth 1 (from left)

Different hair volume and styles can affect how accurately anaesthetists can position the head and neck suitably for intubation.

The training mannequin includes several interchangeable hair styles which add another variable to a realistic training scenario. 

Plinth 2

Oedema (swelling) in the larynx (throat area) can occur during pregnancy. The mannequin simulates inflammation in three areas of the throat canal and tongue.

Plinth 3

Realistic head and neck movements are essential for successful medical intervention but standard mannequins incorporate limited pivot points and rotation. The mannequin’s cervical spine is designed to mimic accurate rotation, flexion and extension within each individual vertebra from C1-C7.

Training mannequin tongues and spine

Plinth 4

It is difficult to accurately represent physical characteristics of the human anatomy in a realistic way with resilient materials which can be used on a daily basis.

The research team experimented with a variety of materials and liquids to emulate the articulation and swelling of the tongue and throat. The tactile nature of these artefacts is integral to a realistic training scenario.

Realistic materials

Plint 5

During intubation “Lock-jaw” exhibited by a patient can present a difficult scenario for an anaesthetist.

The mannequin has the ability to variably restrict the movement of the lower mandible, simulating jaw joint dysfunction.

You can find more information about this project here.

What next?

 
REF2021 judges Lab4Living and Art, Design & Media research ‘world leading’ and ‘internationally excellent’ for impact

The latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) results have now been released and REF2021 awards Lab4Living and ADMRC research 4* and 3* for impact. We are delighted to share results from the Art, Design & Media Research Centre (ADRMC) and Lab4Living which demonstrate the impact that our research is having on society, culture and the economy.

Key findings from REF2021:

  • 90% of our research is World leading or internationally excellent (4* and 3*);
  • 83.3% of our impact case studies were judged to be World leading (4*);
  • 100% of our impact case studies were judged to be World leading or internationally excellent (4* and 3*);
  • 100% of our research environment was judged to be World leading or internationally excellent (4* and 3*).

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is the UK’s system for assessing the excellence of research in UK higher education. The last REF was in 2014. ADMRC and Lab4Living submitted its research jointly to Unit of Assessment 32, Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory.

The results confirm the Art, Design & Media Research Centre and Lab4Living as two of the strongest performing research centres in Sheffield Hallam University.

Overall, Sheffield Hallam University has been rated as 72% ‘world leading’ (4) and ‘internationally recognised’ (4).

Impact Case Studies

Three impact case studies formed a significant part (25%) of the ADMRC and Lab4Living’s joint REF2021 submission.

Photo of man wearing Head-Up support collar

Lab4Living

Research undertaken by Lab4Living has underpinned the development of a new generation of products for individuals living with long-term conditions. These have improved quality of life for people with motor neurone disease, cancer and dementia by promoting dignity and independence. This case study details impact in four areas:

Read more…

Still of couple on beach from film 'From Scotland with Love' by Virginia Heath

Prof Virginia Heath

How a film bringing 20th century Scotland to the screen has become a touchstone of Scottish identity

Read more…

Photo of uranium ore sample

Prof Lise Autogena

How a film about a planned uranium mine helped empower a small community in Greenland

Read more…

ADMRC Research Archive

Explore our Research Archive, providing detailed information on over 70 research projects from Art, Design and Media Research Centre and Lab4Living.

 
Call for papers: PhD During COVID-19

Design For Health journal invites short papers on Design for Health PhDs during the Pandemic

This year, the Design For Health journal recognises the impact of COVID-19 on design for health and wellbeing research. We introduce a new submission format which explores the experiences, issues and strategies employed in undertaking a Design for Heath PhD during the pandemic.

Covid-19 has led to global change on a level rarely witnessed over the last century. The devastating impact of this pandemic on the world has yet to be fully understood. As new strains evolve, we will continue to be faced with other challenges which will shape both our research and who we are as researchers.  

The journal team felt it important to take a moment to pause, to acknowledge this time, and to reflect on the how the pandemic has shaped the research we have undertaken across the design for health community.  We are interested in exploring the creative strategies, insights and innovative approaches that design for health researchers have adapted and adopted during the pandemic.

Design For Health invites short papers from all those involved in undertaking, supervising or examining PhDs during the pandemic in relevant disciplines i.e. researchers working at the intersections of design, health, science, creative practice, wellbeing and related fields.

We are particularly interested to receive contributions from PhD students and early career researchers. Accepted papers will be published over the next two volumes of the journal.

It is hoped that through this special theme this we can address questions such as:

  • What did it mean to do a PhD during the pandemic?
  • How was design-led research able to respond to the extreme circumstances we found ourselves facing?
  • Were researchers able to find novel, innovative solutions to the constraints they faced, leading to new discoveries and avenues for investigation?
  • What did the pandemic mean in terms of our understanding of inter-disciplinarity?
  • What were some of the moral and ethical challenges we faced when working with the public and patients where physical contact was impossible?
  • How did researchers undertake practice-based research when they were unable to access the workshop, lab or community?
  • What messages do we want to communicate to future generations about this research?  

Preparing your submission

We invite submissions from PhD candidates, early career researchers, PhD supervisors and examiners of PhD students, responding to the questions above.

Submissions should be single authored. Authors should be candidates, Early Career Researchers, supervisors or examiners of PhD studies in relevant disciplines (please refer to Aims and Scope) which have taken place or been completed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

PhD During COVID-19 submissions are up to 3000 words; with up to 8 figures.

Submissions are via the submission portal at https://rp.tandfonline.com/submission no later than 31 December 2022. Please search for Design for Health and submit as ‘Report’.

All submissions considered in scope will be single blind reviewed by the Editorial Board. Those accepted for publication will be published in Volume 6 or Volume 7 of the journal.

For further information, contact Kirsty Christer, Assistant Editor, k.a.christer@shu.ac.uk

@design4health

 
World-leading Impact for SHU’s Art, Design and Media Research in REF2021

The recent REF2021 results confirm the benefits to society, culture and health of practice-based art, design and media research at Sheffield Hallam University. REF has rated the Art, Design & Media Research Centre (ADMRC) and Lab4Living as 100% World-leading or Internationally excellent for impact.

https://blogs.shu.ac.uk/c3riimpact/adrmc-l4l-world-leading-impact/

 
Lab4Living Cinema Club

Lab4Living Cinema Club is a cultural networking group consisting of screening short films from all over the world on topics related to the research inquiries of the 100 year-life and the Future Home. The purpose of these events is to discover, reflect and debate together on the representation of health, ageing, human psychology and death through audio-visual media.

Researcher and artist Noémie Soula has curated a series of screening sessions, each with a different theme. Screenings are informal events, aimed at staff and post-graduate students, which take place each week in the White Building. Screenings are followed by a discussion. Please contact us if you would like to join us. For those unable to attend, we provide details of the themes, films, and discussion points for you to explore.

Week 3 – Death and Cinema

The subject this week is Death and Cinema and we explore how cinema represents and tells stories about dying, past memories, and loss with four short films. Employing different genres, from drama to animation and science-fiction, this selection lets us experience different perspectives on love, death, grief and loss.

How can cinema and moving images help us experience lost and mourning, share complex emotion and embodied feelings and understand what is mean to be human?

Week 2 – Ageing and Cinema

The subject is Ageing and Cinema, where we explore how cinema represents and tells stories about ageing, illness, and body’s changes through time with four short films. Employing different genres, from drama to fantasy and documentary, this selection lets us experience different perspectives on the passing of time in a human life.

How can cinema and moving images help us experience, share and understand what is ageing and going through life?

Week 1 – Health and Cinema

Our first subject is Health and cinema, where we explore how cinema pictures and narrates healthcare’s systems, patients’ experience and medical practitioners with four short films. From animation to charity appeal, this selection of short films looks at health from different perspectives.

How can cinema and moving images help us experience, share and understand what is health within society?

 
Work by Kaisu Koski exhibited in group show Significant Other by Sweet ‘Art in London

Dr Kaisu Koski‘s new work Interspecies picnic (2022) has been selected for a group show, Significant Other by Sweet ‘Art, in London on June 8-19. The photograph is part of the body of work created during Ars BioArctica Residency at the Kilpisjärvi Biological Station in subarctic Finland, January 2022. The residency focused on permafrost thaw and how interspecies relationships are entangled in both causing and preventing it. The picture is a snapshot of a durational invitation for non-human animals to join a picnic, a common cultural form for human animals to interface with nature. 

Interspecies picnic (2022) 100x135cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

Significant Other exhibition

Exhibition Open: 8th – 19th June 2022, 12.00 -18.00 daily

Opening Party: 9th June 2022 6pm-9pm (tickets via Eventbrite)

Address: The Art Bypass Gallery, 261a City Road, London EC 1V1AJ

Sweet ‘Art is dedicated to the promotion of artists through the delivery of regular site-specific exhibitions. Sweet ‘Art operates from a feminist ethos and exhibits art that is thought provoking, intelligent and challenging in aesthetic and concept, with a specific emphasis on working with artists who are marginalised from the marketplace.

https://www.wearesweetart.com/significant-other

 
Tangible Interaction for Wellbeing workshop at CHI conference

Lab4Living researcher Dr Remi Bec is collaborating with a University of Surrey researcher at a workshop on wellbeing through tangible interaction at a prestigious human-computer interaction conference in May.

At the workshop, Remi and Dr Sarah Campbell will explore the role of technology in promoting social and physical health and wellbeing. They have been selected to take part in the one day workshop, part of this year’s Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) conference in New Orleans in May 2022. The Tangible Interaction for Wellbeing workshop aims to create a manifesto documenting ideas and demonstrating the importance of interaction for wellbeing in a post-pandemic context.

Technology-supported games

Remi and Sarah are interested in exploring the use and role of technology in supporting social and physical wellbeing, drawing on their respective projects. Their approach to promote Health and Wellbeing is to use the fun that games provide.

Independently, they have created two games: ‘Boost Up!’ and ‘Dragons of Afterlands’. Both games are technology-supported yet implemented differently.

In Boost Up!, tracking devices measuring and feedbacking physical activity levels are used to develop a currency to play a series of large scale games.

In Dragons of Afterlands, an app available on phones/tablets is used to play an augmented reality board game.

Boost Up! is therefore on the lower end of the ‘no-tech to high-tech’ spectrum while Dragons of Afterlands is situated on the higher end.

The physical aspects of the games are crucial to encouraging interactions with other players to promote wellbeing. Remi and Sarah draw on their respective games to discuss the role of technology in promoting social and physical health and wellbeing. During the workshop, they will explore the drawbacks of developing and prototyping games which embed technology. They will also discuss the implications when evaluating the games, both for designers and end-users.

CHI conference

The ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) series of academic conferences is generally considered the most prestigious in the field of human-computer interaction. CHI has been held annually since 1982 (including once at Sheffield Hallam University) and attracts thousands of international attendees.

About the researcher

Remi Bec‘s research explores the use of games to promote engagement and behaviour change. He has co-developed, prototyped and evaluated iteratively Boost Up!, and created social enterprise GoFit4Fun CIC. GoFit4Fun CIC acts as a vehicle to translate the knowledge gained through research into solutions that are implemented into the real world.

 
Death is part of life. Let’s talk about it…

Thinking and talking about death, end of life arrangements and loss can be daunting and difficult. How do we discuss death? Where do we begin?
If you have been wondering about these matters, come join us in one of our sessions to get to know the Life Café and Death Café

The Life Café is a set of guided group activities designed to promote and support conversations about what individuals find meaningful in life and in care. A Death Café is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes.

You can look forward to experiencing one of these cafe formats as a participant in a relaxing and supportive setting. You will explore, with others who may be in similar positions, how these approaches might ease you into taking the first step to consider and talk about what matters at the end.

Event details

  • Thursday 12th May 2022, 1pm to  4pm
  • Friday 13th May 2022, 3pm to 6pm
  • Location: The White Building, Fitzalan Square, Sheffield S1 2AZ

Book your spot at one of our sessions now! Snacks and drinks are provided.

The event is free but spaces are limited. We understand that unforeseen circumstances may prevent you from attending the session you have registered for. We appreciate you notifying us in advance if you cannot attend; this can help us prepare and ensure that interested parties on the waiting list have an opportunity to attend the event.

About the event and the organisers

The event is co-organised and brought to you by Lab4Living, Compassionate Sheffield, and Penny Merrett.

Lab4Living is one of the longest established living labs in Europe and is based in Sheffield Hallam University. The trans-disciplinary research group gathers and works with a community of researchers and partners in design, healthcare and creative practice to develop products, services and interventions that promote dignity and enhance quality of life.

Compassionate Sheffield is here to collaborate with individuals, communities and organisations, enabling them to do the small things that make a big difference to our life and experiences of death. Connecting and supporting people, communities and organisations to harness the power of compassion, will create a happier and healthier Sheffield.

Penny Merrett is an End of Life Doula who facilitates Death Cafes in various venues in Sheffield as well as a monthly online Death Cafe.

 
What’s on in the White Building: April 2022

We’re delighted to host this month Design Futures: a retrospective – 20 years of design impact. On show are selected projects conducted by Sheffield Hallam University’s packaging and product design group.

Design Futures is a team of award-winning product and packaging designers and researchers. With frequent collaborations with Lab4Living, Design Futures is helping people to live longer, happier and healthier lives by developing new packaging and product solutions.

Design Futures’ work is informed by the latest research methods and practice through close links with the Art, Design and Media Research Centre. The product and packaging design teams have played a role in supporting regional businesses in the Sheffield City Region through Knowledge Exchange programmes.

In this exhibition, discover some of the challenges that many organisations and companies face and the creative ways in which design can respond to help grow our economy, protect our planet, and support our communities. You’ll be able to see how human-centred design and innovation can make things better for users.

Regional businesses will have the opportunity to meet the designers and discuss possible collaborations and funding at two separate lunch time events on 6th and 20th April, organised with Sheffield Innovation Programme.

For prospective students visiting the University’s Open Day on Saturday 23rd April, you will have an opportunity to visit the exhibition, which is just across the road from the Art and Design Department in the Head Post Office building.

Exhibition details

About Design Futures

The Advanced Product Development Centre, now known as Design Futures, was set up in 1997 by Sheffield Hallam’s Art & Design Research Centre in collaboration with the University of Sheffield. It was set up as a commercially focused product & packaging design consultancy group to support the regeneration of the Sheffield sub region.

Lab4Living and Design Futures have frequently worked together on projects in health and wellbeing settings, such as Support4All, The Life Cafe, Head Up and Journeying Through Dementia.


What next?

 
Noémie Soula selected as the winner of the LEONARDO REBOOTED: Synthetic Biology Award

Thanks to this grant, she is developing a new art research project entitled ‘Mythical Living Data: An Inquiry into the Future of DNA as Data Storage‘.

The Synthetic Biology category was judged by an international jury of arts and science curators, and experts in pharmacology, cell therapy and synthetic.

LEONARDO REBOOTED is a production grant created by Da Vinci Labs (FR) and curated/coordinated by Quo Artis (ES). Da Vinci Labs will be a multi-disciplinary research centre aiming to engage in critical contemporary issues and foster innovation in Art & Science practices.

Noémie Soula is an interdisciplinary arts practitioner, interweaving life sciences, storytelling and design, and focusing on exploring alternative futuristic scenarios.

 
What’s on in the White Building: March 2022

This month, the White Building hosts the first in a series of exhibitions continuing with themes of ageing. ‘Re-imagining ageing‘ is a collaboration between Lab4Living and Sheffield artist Laura Page. It presents films and photographic portraits and stories which reimagine ageing and defy stereotypes of what it is to be older. 

Key to Lab4Living’s approach is the use of exhibitions to helps us seek out and frame questions about how we live, and how we see ourselves as we age. Through this exhibition, viewers can reflect, challenge and perhaps re-imagine what it means to grow older. 

The 100-year life is a programme of research in Lab4Living which explores the role of design and creative practice in disrupting existing medical, social and cultural discourses around ageing.  

Re-Imagining Ageing

Over the last two years, film, photography and creative writing have offered methods to give voice to different perspectives of ageing and in doing so to build understanding of the diverse experiences of individuals across the UK.

As part of a series of linked exhibitions, titled ‘Re-imagining ageing’, we are inviting people from across Sheffield to hear these stories. We hope that in doing so, we will create space to help viewers to reflect, to challenge and perhaps to re-imagine what it means to grow older. 

The work has been created through a collaboration between Lab4Living and Sheffield artist Laura Page. Alongside a number of films of older people, we host a series of photographs generated by local communities in and around Sheffield. These include Roshni South Asian Women’s Resource Centre, Poet Debjani Chatterjee and Longley Park College. 

A sister exhibition of Laura’s work, Hidden Depths, will be shown simultaneously at Persistence Works, Yorkshire Artspace between 4th and 24th March 2022.

Exhibition details

Reimagining Ageing - with Laura Page
Reimagining Ageing – with Laura Page

About the artist

The exhibition features work from Roshni South Asian Women’s Resource Centre, Poet Debjani Chatterjee and Longley Park College. It is a collaboration with Laura Page.

Laura Page is an artist, photographer, photojournalist and socially engaged practitioner. Her artwork is a mixture of photography, film, sound and mixed media and she often collaborates with others.  Much of her work explores people, society, politics, culture and philosophy.


What next?

 
New MA in Design for Health at Sheffield Hallam University

Two brand new courses launch this Autumn at Sheffield Hallam University, aimed at students interested in pursuing creative research at the intersection of design and health.

Expand your horizons at the home of Lab4Living and innovate for social good by applying your creative skills and imagination to foster a healthy society. These new courses provide a unique combination of research and commercial expertise in the area of Health and wellbeing, and Art & Design teaching and knowhow.

Prospective students can choose either a 15 month MA in Design for Health or a 4-month PgCert Lab for Living.

Students will have access to high quality art and design teaching, plus expertise and knowledge from research staff and within one of the longest established living labs in Europe. Lab4Living also has close links through its staff and projects with the award-winning commercial design consultancy Design Futures, which has a strong track record in industrial partnership.

The new courses

The MA route offers a full time 15 month course. This course will enable students to:

  • Develop skills, knowledge and capability to pursue opportunities and conduct independent creative research arising from the intersection of design and health.
  • Expand your professional aspirations and innovate by synergising your creative practice with critical and conceptual thinking around design and health.
  • Develop or expand your professional relationships and networks.
  • Receive teaching from world class design for health researchers and practitioners  

For those interested in a shorter course, Sheffield Hallam University also offers a 4 month PgCert Lab for Living which will enable you to:

  • Develop an understanding of the diverse range of concepts, approaches, issues and debates related to design for health research, practice and its related fields.
  • Explore and articulate your professional aspirations within contemporary models of design for health practice, linked to your disciplinary field.
  • Develop the ability to use appropriate knowledge and methods at a professional level to engage in design for health projects. 

Who are the courses for?

The courses are aimed at potential students with “a strong interest in inquiry at the intersections of design & creativity and health & wellbeing.” The MA is principally aimed at designers from a variety of specialties. The PgCert is open to a wider range of professionals and health stakeholders, such as those from pharmaceutical or biomedical industries, the NHS or any stakeholder from the health sector interested in collaborating with designers. The PgCert will also appeal to designers interested in the subject but who prefer to commit to a shorter course.

Further information

The courses are open to students from Autumn 2022. For full details, follow the links below or contact the course leader, Dr Carlos Peralta at C.Peralta@shu.ac.uk

 
Kaisu Koski speaks at University of Lapland’s Arctic Centre, following Arctic residency

To conclude a month-long Ars BioArctica Residency in Kilpisjärvi Biological Station in Finland, Dr. Kaisu Koski gave a talk “Art+Science Climate Crisis Research” for the Global Change Research Group at the Arctic Centre of the University of Lapland on January 31, 2022.

Several snow and reindeer researchers were present at the talk in the Arktikum building, and Kaisu will continue to connect to them with her emerging climate crisis research with Dr. Peter Lloyd Jones. 

Photo by Kaisu Koski
Photo by Kaisu Koski

 
Ursula Ankeny begins child health tech PhD with Sheffield Children’s Hospital

Lab4Living researcher Ursula Ankeny is undertaking a PhD exploring child health technology, beginning February 2022. Jointly funded by Sheffield Children’s Hospital and Sheffield Hallam University, the PhD will explore how co-designed technology can be used to support the more invisible aspects of paediatric long-term condition management. Examples of these invisible aspects include emotional burden, communication between stakeholders and wider life impacts.

 
Pioneer of inclusive design, Pattie Moore, awarded honorary doctorate by Sheffield Hallam

Following her honorary doctorate award last month, designer and social scientist Pattie Moore will visit Lab4Living next Spring as a visiting researcher.

Pattie Moore is credited as one of the founders of Universal Design, and her work has inspired generations of designers to rethink how products and services can be designed to meet the needs of the widest range of consumers possible.

In 1979, at the age of 26 Pattie embarked a 3-year experiment to explore life as it might be for an older person. This was a completely immersive experience. Disguised as an 85-year-old woman with glasses that blurred her vision, bandages around her torso and wearing awkward, uneven shoes she travelled through the United States and Canada, visiting over 100 Cities and using this experience to build understanding of the everyday challenges older people faced and how they were treated.

Prof Claire Craig said:

The findings of Pattie’s research were ground-breaking. It highlighted how products and environments could themselves be disabling and brought into focus some of the difficulties older people faced in navigating the world on a daily basis.

This work was key in identifying the stigmatising nature of ageing and importance of design and the role it has to play. Pattie continues to challenge the status quo and to blaze a path for inclusiveness. She holds many accolades, has written widely on inclusive design, and continues to inspire the next generation. To the graduating classes of 20202 and 2021 at Sheffield Hallam University, Pattie sent her congratulations:

I am confident that as the protectors and providers of our future life’s quality you will not only meet, but exceed, what is expected in a world where we welcome the creative delivery of dignity and equity for all.

Pattie Moore (Hon D.Arts, Sheffield Hallam University)

Although Pattie was not able to attend last month’s graduation ceremony in person to receive her award, we are excited to announce that she will be visiting the Lab next Spring. We will be arranging a series of activities which link to our ongoing research on Re-imagining ageing.

Watch this space for updates!

https://lab4living.org.uk/projects/re-imagining-ageing/

 
‘Re-Imagining Ageing’ in the White Building

Last week, Lab4Living hosted a reading and exhibition showcasing new poetry which explores themes of ageing. The event in the White Building was led by Lab4Living researcher Dr Joan Healey, an occupational therapist at Sheffield Hallam University.

Over 100 pieces of poetry were written by participants in writing groups in Sheffield and beyond. Participants were invited to reflect on what ageing feels like and what it means to be an older person. The event was the first opportunity for the writing group participants to meet and share their work in person since the pandemic began.

Poetry readings in the White Building

As part of Lab4Living’s Research England funded research on the 100-year life we are developing the use of creative methods to give voice to different perspectives of ageing. We aim to build understanding of the experiences of individuals and to examine the role of objects in shaping what it means to be an older person. Work currently on view in the White Building spotlights enquiries from different perspectives, one led by occupational therapist Joan Healey, and the other by product designer Tom Maisey.

Participants view the exhibition of poetry

Written word and the lived experience

Dr Joan Healey is an occupational therapist and writer in the Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Life-Sciences at Sheffield Hallam University. Her work with Lab4Living explores how the written word can illuminate the lived experience, helping to facilitate meaningful engagement and contribute to health and wellbeing education.

Joan began this project by contacting some writing groups who were meeting online during the pandemic and inviting them to participate in some creative writing. She provided some writing prompts as a starting point for people to write prose or poetry about issues around ageing, the mismatch of external views of ageing and the personal feelings of ageing; people’s experiences of time; the lived experience of their own ageing. Joan facilitated some of the groups and other groups ran the workshops themselves. People were invited to contribute any of their writing to the project.

Exhibition and event

A selection of pieces of writing from over 100 contributions is currently on show in the White Building.

We want to celebrate the thoughtful, challenging and beautifully evocative writing from the participants and to use the writing as prompts for debate and discussion about how we view ageing.

Joan Healey

At last Tuesday’s event (held during the afternoon and in the evening), writing group participants were able to meet for the first time since the pandemic. They were able to read from their work and view the pieces on display along with members of the Lab4Living team.



Following the exhibition, Joan hopes to produce an anthology of the all the work which will celebrate the work of the participants and support undergraduate teaching in Health and Wellbeing.

  • Further info: For more information about how you can view the exhibition and / or get involved, please contact Joan Healey.
  • Project partners: Sheffield Libraries, Sheffield Women’s writing group, SWit’CH Swinton writers group, Guildford U3A

What next?

 
What’s on in the White Building: Nov 2021

This month, we showcase work which explores and responds to themes of ageing. We host an exhibition of poetry work re-imagines ageing, reflecting on the lived experience. In the windows, we display existing products for older people as prompts for examining the role of objects and what it means to be an older person.

Key to Lab4Living’s approach is the use of exhibitions to helps us seek out and frame questions about how we want to live and how the 100 year life might look. Through exhibition, objects and words act as prompts and provide a forum for conversation. The objects and exhibition in the White Building this month are themed around ageing.

As part of Lab4Living’s Research England funded research on the 100-year life we are developing the use of creative methods to give voice to different perspectives of ageing. We aim to build understanding of the experiences of individuals and to examine the role of objects in shaping what it means to be an older person. Work currently on view in the White Building spotlights enquiries from different perspectives, one led by occupational therapist Joan Healey, and the other by product designer Tom Maisey.

Re-Imagining Poetry

Work work by Joan Healey explores how the written word can illuminate the lived experience, helping to facilitate meaningful engagement and contribute to health and wellbeing education.

Dr Joan Healey is an occupational therapist and writer in the Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Life-Sciences at Sheffield Hallam University. She has joined the Lab4Living team and has been exploring what ageing feels like.

Joan began this project by contacting some writing groups who were meeting online during the pandemic and inviting them to participate in some creative writing. She provided some writing prompts as a starting point for people to write prose or poetry about issues around ageing, the mismatch of external views of ageing and the personal feelings of ageing; people’s experiences of time; the lived experience of their own ageing. Joan facilitated some of the groups and other groups ran the workshops themselves. People were invited to contribute any of their writing to the project.

Exhibition

A selection of pieces of writing from over 100 contributions is being exhibited as posters in the White Building.

We want to celebrate the thoughtful, challenging and beautifully evocative writing from the participants and to use the writing as prompts for debate and discussion about how we view ageing.

Joan Healey

One intention is to use the collection of writing with Sheffield Hallam students in the College of Health, Wellbeing and Life Sciences (including Occupational Therapy students) and with the public. 

Lab4Living will host an event on Tuesday 16 November which gives a chance for the participants to meet and see some of their work presented. The event will include live poetry readings. Following the exhibition, Joan hopes to produce an anthology of the all the work which will celebrate the work of the participants and support undergraduate teaching in Health and Wellbeing.

  • Further info: For more information about how you can view the exhibition and / or get involved, please contact Joan Healey.
  • Project partners: Sheffield Libraries, Sheffield Women’s writing group, SWit’CH Swinton writers group, Guildford U3A

The Assistive Product and Activities for People with dementia

Work by Research Associate Tom Maisey is exploring the role of objects in the context of ageing, and the responsibility of designers to consider issues of dignity and respect when designing assistive products for older people. The items in the windows of the White Building are examples of products currently on the market and the audience is invited to respond to the following questions.

The Assistive Product

Are these products desirable?

As we age, we have to make changes to meet our health needs. We might need objects to help us in our daily lives. It’s vital that design responds to this in a sensitive way.

We all want the objects we own and use to look good and be desirable, whatever our age and abilities. Designers have a responsibility to make sure dignity is maintained for those using the products they create. It’s important that products aren’t patronising and have the right look and details. However, many products associated with later life don’t yet meet those needs. There is a need to establish a new aesthetic. The artefacts on exhibition here are examples of the limited product range currently available. We use them as a starting point for discussions about the role of objects and what it means to be an older person.

Assistive products currently on the market, exhibited as prompts for conversations around dignity and ageing

Activities for people with dementia

Can design provide a better experience for people living with dementia?

Taking part in meaningful activities as we age is crucial in maintaining physical and mental wellbeing as well as quality of life. A lack of desirable, age-appropriate products for people with dementia reduces opportunities for residents in care homes to take part in meaningful activities. It can have a big impact on residents by increasing boredom and depression.

This presents us with an opportunity to respond with design. The artefacts on exhibition are examples of the limited product range currently available.

Activities for people with dementia – exhibiting products currently on the market to prompt conversations about dignity and meaningful activity

What next?

 
Paul Chamberlain visits Universita luav Di Venezia

Today, Prof Paul Chamberlain has been presenting Lab4Living’s Design and the 100-year life work to researchers and students at the Universita luav Di Venezia in Venice. 

Sharing Lab4Living’s work with students and researchers at Universita luav Di Venezia

Paul coincided the visit with the Time, Space, Existence exhibition, part of the Venice Architectural Biennale where he is currently exhibiting. 

Time, Space, Existence exhibition at the Venice Architectural Biennale

 

Paul is pictured with Professor Medardo Chiapponi and teaching assistants who are leading projects that focus on design and health.

 
Noémie Soula recognised for outstanding peer review

Research Associate Noémie Soula has received recognition for her high quality review this year in an international peer reviewed journal. Contemporary arts and science journal Leonardo, which is published by MIT Press, regularly recognises exceptional peer reviewers in their network. In its October newsletter, Leonardo extended gratitude and congratulations to four reviewers, including Noémie, for their ‘in-depth and deeply constructive feedback on papers under consideration for publication’.

Congratulations to Noémie!

Leonardo is the leading international peer-reviewed journal on the use of contemporary science and technology in the arts and music and the application and influence of the arts and humanities on science and technology.

Noémie Soula is an interdisciplinary arts practitioner, interweaving life sciences, storytelling and design, and focusing on exploring alternative futuristic scenarios.

 
Paul Chamberlain to give Future Home keynote at Occupational Therapy conference

Professor Paul Chamberlain will give a keynote this week at an Occupation Therapy conference on the Evolution of Home. His talk on the Future Home will draw on over 10 years of Future Bathroom research and current work focussing on the 100 year life. This invited keynote is on the first day of the annual Royal College of Occupational Therapists conference on Housing which takes place during Occupational Therapy Week 2021.

The conference is for members of the Royal College of Occupational Therapists Special Section on Housing (RCOT SS: Housing). RCOT SS: Housing provides a forum for occupational therapists and occupational therapy staff that have an interest in housing, inclusive design and accessible home environments. This year’s conference focuses on how good design and aesthetics play an important role in how we use and interact with our living spaces. It takes place online on 4th and 5th November 2021.

 
Kaisu Koski’s HUG installation on show at Immune Nations exhibition

Kaisu Koski’s wearable garment prototype HUG is being shown at an exhibition showing new work produced in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The HUG photograph is exhibited as part of Immune Nations, an evidence-based exhibition about the constructive role that art can play in public discourse around life-saving vaccines. The exhibition runs at the McMaster Museum of Art in Hamilton, Canada from 14th September to 10th December 2021.

In her ‘pandemic work’ during 2020, Kaisu has been considering how social distancing could be seen as part of disease prevention in the absence of vaccines.

HUG - Kaisu Koski.
HUG – Kaisu Koski. Image courtesy of the artist

The wearable garment prototype HUG creates the tactile sensation of a hug without the presence of another person.

While one of the primary gestures in expressing love and care, a hug has now become a potential health hazard, leaving many of us deprived of the human touch.

Kaisu Koski

The exhibition brochure and a virtual tour are available at the McMaster Museum of Art’s website. The exhibition continues until 10th December 2021.

HUG is also being presented at other exhibitions and events throughout the year – see the project page for more details.

Kaisu recently gave a talk on her work at the Nordic Edge Expo, in Stavanger, Norway as part of an Innoasis “Art Science Cocktails” event. These in-person events create an interdisciplinary mingling opportunity for researchers, artists, students with short talks and an exquisite cocktail menu. The “Caring Futures edition” on 21 September was a brainteaser to introduce the concept of how technology might aid, challenge or change our concepts of care and caring in the future.

Kaisu Koski is Associate Professor of Art and Design at Lab4Living. She is currently filming in the White Building with Lab4Living collaborator Noemie Soula for a joint project, to be announced soon.

 
Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) mask is runner up at Medipex Innovation Awards

Lab4Living researchers Heath Reed and Matt Willox’s work on Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) masks for young people has been recognised at the Yorkshire and Humber regional healthcare innovation hub awards. Their project was awarded Runner Up prize at the Medipex Innovation Awards ceremony on 22nd September.

Medipex Innovation Awards

The awards celebrate the ways in which NHS colleagues have gone over and above, this year more than ever, to find ways to improve patient care. Entries were submitted into 4 categories and were judged by representatives from Medipex, Medovate and the YHAHSN. This project, also known as the the COMFORT project, was in the category for Innovations that are designed to improve the outcomes for patients and/or service delivery organisations.

The COMFORT Project

The COMFORT project (Custom-made Masks for Overnight Respiratory Therapy) for Children requiring Non-Invasive Ventilation is a collaboration between Lab4Living, NIHR Devices for Dignity, Sheffield children’s NHS Foundation Trust and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust.

Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is breathing support delivered through a facemask. Well-fitting masks are difficult to find for children. Inadequate ventilation can have significant health and quality of life impacts. 

This project aimed to investigate 3D technology to improve comfort, fit and performance of NIV masks for children.

Co-design events helped the project team to understand the patients’ needs. 3D scanning methods were assessed and the best performing scanner selected. The final design involved a 3D printed frame, covered with silicone. Mask materials and manufacturing processes met the required quality standards. 

73% patients reported comfort and fit that was as good or better than their usual mask. Oxygen levels and sleep quality were improved. Appearance of the mask received positive feedback. Health economics demonstrated that a custom-made mask would be cost effective at a price below £500. Further work on integration of the process into NHS services is planned.

Read more about this project here.

 
‘Is the Patient Breathing?’: Lab4Living hosts new play tackling mental health

Lab4Living has hosted the first public sharing of a new play by award-winning playwright tackling issue of depression and suicide in men. The play was performed on Tuesday to an invited audience and aims to help raise awareness and encourage discussion on difficult topics.

The play has been written by Brian Daniels following the suicide of 31 year old Ross McCarthy, originally from Sheffield. Ross took his life following ten years of struggling with severe depression and then being put on a six month long waiting list for therapy.

Ross McCarthy’s story

Mr Daniels, who lives in Leeds, said he was so moved by a news report on Ross’s death that he felt compelled to write the piece inspired by Ross’s story.  He has previously written plays covering important health and social issues including dementia, palliative care and historical child abuse which have been widely performed for organisations including NHS Trusts, Hospitals, Hospices and Universities.  He said that drama is an impactful way to create an environment of discussion and debate.  

Lab4Living’s Kirsty Christer welcomes the audience
Actors performing ‘Is the Patient Breathing?’ by Brian Daniels

First event at the White Building

The play, performed by professional actors, was the first public event to be hosted by Lab4Living in its new premises in the White Building, in Fitzalan Square. The White Building provided an intimate and informal space for this poignant play, which was performed in the afternoon and again in the evening. The invited audience included researchers and city council representatives, as well as friends and members of Ross’ family. Audience members spoke of the power of the play and took part in a discussion following each performance.

“This was an incredibly moving event. It felt wonderful bringing together communities and audiences to witness the role the arts play in highlighting the hugely important topic of suicide.”

Prof Claire Craig, Co-Director of Lab4Living
Lab4Living Director Prof Claire Craig facilitates a discussion after the play

Young Men and Mental Health

Suicide is the biggest killer of UK men under 45. The stark statistic tells us little of the backstory. In his farewell letter Ross McCarthy, who left behind his fiancée Charlotte, 4 year old son Charlie and his parents and sister, asked his family to campaign for better mental health support. He wrote ‘It’s just not there’.

My family and I know that our lives will never be the same again.  Losing Ross is unbearably painful but we are heartened beyond words to think that something so positive can come from our tragedy and the tragedy of thousands of others.  I believe that this play can help shine a light on something that is largely overlooked.  We are so grateful to Brian Daniels for his care and humanity in researching our story and for being bold enough to present a play based on a subject which has remained taboo for far too long.  

Ross’s dad Mike, a former TV reporter and presenter
The first public event in Lab4Living’s new premises at the White Building

Hosting this play represents the ongoing collaboration between the renowned playwright Brian Daniels and Lab4Living, including hosting an earlier play in 2019 which focussed on accessing end of life care. Lab4Living’s approach to using creative practice to explore health and wellbeing issues includes previous work creating objects to help young people visualise and manage chronic pain.

The performing arts provide another powerful tool to help us understand mental health issues and barriers to support services.

Claire Craig

TalkClub

In discussions following the performances, audience members noted Sheffield’s large student population includes many young men who might find it difficult to discuss their mental health. Mike McCarthy has set up a Sheffield branch of TalkClub, a mental fitness movement for men, which meets every Wednesday evening at Sheffield United Football ground between 6 and 8 pm.

Support organisations

Sheffield Hallam University: Press Release 22 Sep 2021

For more information on this and other original plays on themes of health and wellbeing, contact Brian Daniels, Artistic Director: Pluto Productions, brdan@icloud.com 

 
Leeds based playwright compelled to tackle issue of male suicide with latest production after reading one family’s plight

View Yorkshire Evening Post article

 
What’s on in the White Building: Sep 2021

The windows of the White Building are a window into the world of Lab4Living, providing a snapshot of our activity in Sheffield’s civic centre. Artefacts on display include internationally exhibited pieces, current prototypes and emerging projects. This month, work from the HOSPITAbLe furniture collection and playful artefacts from the Future Care Home project are on display.

Key to Lab4Living’s research is the role of objects. We make artefacts that do not necessarily present solutions but help us seek out and frame questions about how we want to live and how the 100 year life might look. Through exhibition, objects can therefore act as prompts and provide a forum for conversation. We also understand the value of objects which can facilitate meaningful engagement for people in a range of settings.

HOSPITAbLe

This research draws on the value of thinking with things through physical metaphors. It explores the value in taking everyday experiences as a starting point when developing products for healthcare at home. The HOSPITAbLe collection reflects upon and imagines an ambiguous future domestic landscape. This work has previously been exhibited in Amsterdam, Prague, Edinburgh, Yorkshire Art Space and Nottingham.

HOSPITAbLe. Paul Chamberlain

Future Care Home

In the Future Care Home project, design researchers are investigating the development of playful artefacts to support the wellbeing of older people. This builds on existing work and ongoing collaborations with residents and staff in Sheffield care homes. Here we have created research-informed products which promote meaningful engagement between residents in care homes, their families and care staff. Currently we are working with residents and staff to evaluate the artefacts.

Future Care Home
Future Care Home

What next?

 
Noemie Soula to present at NEW NOW Festival of Digital Arts

Noémie Soula will present her work Raw/ à vif or the unnatural desire to design a human at the conference “Another End is Possible” on 19 September. The conference is part of the NEW NOW Festival of Digital Arts in Europe taking place this Autumn. Raw/ à vif transports the audience to three possible medical futures, exploring the consequences of designing a human body.

This presentation focuses on Soula‘s recent work called Raw/ à vif or the unnatural desire to design a human, which is a research-driven and critical project at the crossroad between transhumanism, biology, and art. By exploring how humanity could be transformed by current scientific research, the inquiry exposes three imaginary scenarios depicting new job positions. 

The presentation will focus on how speculative design can act as a medium to imagine and experience alternative futures as well as a tool to reinvent the relationship between humans, technologies, and nature to transgress possibilities.

What are the consequences of designing a human body? How will biotechnologies modify what we define as humankind?

As well as presenting during the NEW NOW Festival, Soula’s work ‘Raw/ à vif or the unnatural desire to design a human‘ is currently being exhibited at the Epidermotopia exhibition in Paris.

NEW NOW Festival

NEW NOW is the new festival for Digital Arts in Europe which will explore notions of ‘From Not-Yet to New Now’ through rethinking the coexistence of humans, nature and technology. It takes place from 27 Aug to 03 October 2021 in the UNESCO World Heritage Zollverein in Essen, Germany. The pioneering programme includes residencies, exhibitions, ‘phygical’ (physical / digital) events, installations, and a conference ‘Another End is Possible‘, at which Soula will present and co-lead a panel.

“Another End is Possible” conference at NEW NOW

Under the title “Another End is Possible”, an international and interdisciplinary conference will take place September 18-19 as part of the Festival. It will explore questions around the interplay of humans, nature and technology: 

While the world is becoming increasingly complex and the advance of technology is rapid, our environment is becoming more and more imbalanced. The end of the world seems to be approaching. Or has the end—the “doomsday”—already come? Assuming we are already standing on the ruins of our society, how can we achieve a cooperative new start? How can we rethink our way of living so that humans, biosphere and technology can coexist in the “New Now”? 

On 19 Sep, Soula will give a presentation and lead a panel, ‘RE-CREATING’ A DREAM TO SHARE with Amber Jae Slooten. This panel looks at the future of human identity, in which identity is no longer bound to a human biology and a haptic space. Between biotechnology and self-construction, the speakers will explore ways to re-describe what it means to be human and to relate it to the environment in a (sustainable) way.

Festival: NEW NOW
Conference: “Another End is Possible” 
Location: Zollverein UNESCO World Heritage, Mixing Plant, 45141 Essen, Germany
Organisers: NEW NOW festival for Digital Arts in Europe
Dates: 18-19 Sep 2021
Website: //newnow-festival.com
Tickets: //newnow-festival.com/en/dabei-sein

About the Artist

Noémie Soula is a French artist who joined Lab4Living as a research assistant in 2020. Her practice and research interests sit at the crossroad between art and science, looking at what defines or even redefines humankind. This piece of work is part of the research focus on the 100-year life and the Future Home.

 
Noemie Soula to present at Epidermotopia exhibition in Paris

Noémie Soula presents Raw/ à vif or the unnatural desire to design a human at the exhibition Epidermotopia in Paris. The work transports the audience to three possible medical futures, exploring the consequences of designing a human body.

Organised by COLLECTIVES, a curatorial organisation composed of seven women that fosters emerging creators, the exhibition Epidermotopia gathers nine artists from all over Europe working around the concept of ‘surface’ in its largest dimension.

The exhibition’s concept was born from the connections between humans and the terrestrial biosphere, wondering how bodies interact with their ambient environment. More precisely, it is about exploring the fictional potentialities which arises from the human epidermis. The exhibition is about investigating the different and interwoven materiality of skins, membranes and objects.

Soula’s work Raw/ à vif or the unnatural desire to design a human is a research-driven and critical project at the crossroad between transhumanism, biology, and art, transporting the audience in three possible medical futures. By exploring how humanity could be transformed by current scientific research, the inquiry exposes three imaginary scenarios depicting new job positions. 

What are the consequences of designing a human body? How will biotechnologies modify what we define as humankind?

Noémie Soula is one of 9 artists presenting work at the Epidermotopia exhibition in Paris.

Credit: Rosie Broadhead et Marion Lasserre

Exhibition: “Epidermotopia” 
Location: Plateforme, 73 rue des Haies, 75 020 Paris, France
Organisers: Collectives
Dates: 10 Sep 2021 – 26 Sep 2021
Website: www.plateforme-paris.com
Pieces by the artists will be available for sale.

Credit: Noémie Soula

About the Artist

Noémie Soula is a French artist who joined Lab4Living as a research assistant in 2020. Her practice and research interests sit at the crossroad between art and science, looking at what defines or even redefines humankind. This piece of work is part of the research focus on the 100-year life and the Future Home.

 
Design For Health Vol 5 issue 1 Apr 2021, edited by Paul Chamberlain

In the first issue of the year, Design For Health purposely presents a collection of papers that exemplify the diversity of approaches and applications in design and health.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Online
Editors: Paul Chamberlain, Claire Craig, Paul Atkinson, Kirsty Christer
Print / Online ISSN: 2473-5132 / 2473-5140
Published: Three times per year; est. 2017

This issue presents papers adopting more traditional quantitative studies alongside positioning papers that don’t necessary present answers but raise and encourage debate on important emerging issues and potential new spaces for research within this broad field of enquiry.

The global relevance and interest is evident; papers come from Canada, Spain, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the UK.

The issue includes two papers co-authored by researchers from Lab4Living. Claire Craig et al. reflect on approaches to ethics for researchers working in health contexts in  ‘Development of an Ethical Road Map’. Chris Redford is a co-author on Powell et al.’s paper evaluating a co-designed prototype psychoeducational activity book for seven- to eleven-year-olds with ADHD. The issue also includes a paper on Digital sovereignty by Pierri and Herlo. This is the first of several papers resulting from the 5th Design4Health conference which would have taken place in Amsterdam in 2020.

In his editorial ‘Transformation of health …. and design?’Paul Chamberlain notes that this issue presents research undertaken both preceding and during the COVID pandemic. It is important to reflect on whether approaches and methods are still relevant, have changed due to the pandemic, and where we might be experiencing a transitional moment where design research in health will change significantly.

Links

 
Funding awarded to develop novel technologies for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Management

Lab4Living researcher Ursula Ankeny has been awarded funding by The Children’s Hospital Charity for her project to further develop and conduct a ‘real-world’ proof-of-concept assessment of a suite of three products for children and young people with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The products collectively aim to improve the independence and functional ability of children with JIA. For more details about the award, follow this link:

Funding awarded to develop novel technologies for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Management- NIHR CYP MedTech News, August 2021

More details about the project can be found on the JIA project page.

 
Design For Health Vol 5 issue 1 Apr 2021, edited by Paul Chamberlain

In the first issue of the year, Design For Health purposely presents a collection of papers that exemplify the diversity of approaches and applications in design and health.

Issue: Volume 5, issue 1 April 2021
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Online
Editors: Paul Chamberlain, Claire Craig, Paul Atkinson, Kirsty Christer
Print / Online ISSN: 2473-5132 / 2473-5140
Published: Three times per year; est. 2017

This issue presents papers adopting more traditional quantitative studies alongside positioning papers that don’t necessary present answers but raise and encourage debate on important emerging issues and potential new spaces for research within this broad field of enquiry.

The global relevance and interest is evident; papers come from Canada, Spain, New Zealand, the Netherlands and the UK.

The issue includes two papers co-authored by researchers from Lab4Living. Firstly, Claire Craig et al. reflect on approaches to ethics for researchers working in health contexts in  ‘Development of an Ethical Road Map’. Secondly, Chris Redford is a co-author on Powell et al.’s paper evaluating a co-designed prototype psychoeducational activity book for seven- to eleven-year-olds with ADHD. The issue also includes a paper on Digital sovereignty by Pierri and Herlo. This is the first of several papers resulting from the 5th Design4Health conference which would have taken place in Amsterdam in 2020.

In his editorial ‘Transformation of health …. and design?’Paul Chamberlain notes that this issue presents research undertaken both preceding and during the COVID pandemic. It is important to reflect on whether approaches and methods are still relevant, have changed due to the pandemic, and where we might be experiencing a transitional moment where design research in health will change significantly.

Links

 
BioDesign Challenge: The Living Sponge

This week, a team of Art and Design students present their concepts The Living Sponge at the Biodesign Challenge Summit. The postgraduate students have worked with a range of experts including Lab4Living researchers to compete in the international Biodesign Challenge. They will join students from 20 countries in showcasing their biotech projects before an international audience and panel of 60 pioneers in art, design, and technology.

The Living Sponge

The Biodesign Challenge is an international education program and competition which challenges students to envision and develop applications in biotech. Students are challenged to develop ideas which bridge art, design, and biology to reimagine a more sustainable and equitable future.

It is grounded in the UN Sustainable Development Goal 13 (taking action to combat climate change) and provides an opportunity for Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) students, one of only three universities in the UK to take part in the competition, to engage in work which could have real world impact and make a positive contribution society globally.

Research informed teaching

Students from across the Art & Design MA courses worked in cross disciplinary teams to prepare projects in response to the BioDesign Challenge brief, with input from teaching staff, researchers from Lab4Living and invited external experts. Teaching staff from the Department of Art and Design, led by Dr Eve Stirling, have been supporting the teams of students with input from Lab4Living researchers Prof Peter Lloyd Jones, Noemie Soula and Marika Grasso.

Press release: Hallam students named as finalists for Biodesign Challenge

At an internal selection process in May, one team was picked to develop their project, The Living Sponge, and present it online at this year’s BioDesign Challenge Summit on 23rd June.

The Living Sponge

The Living Sponge is a dystopian futuristic fiction that uses living calcareous sponge properties to create an artificial living sponge that interacts with the external environment by collecting and purifying water. This concept was developed by a team of MA students from Interiors, Packaging, Illustration, and Jewellery and Metalwork.

BioSpecies Sponge Human Baby Illustration. Credit: Xiaozhao Ban

Hannah Morley, one of the design students who will be presenting the project said:

“The Biodesign Challenge was such a potential and transformative opportunity for us, as a team; and a challenge in itself. We hope The Living Sponge can help address global issues or reverse biodiversity loss with newly minted design innovation, relating to the damaging effects climate change has had on the planet regarding water scarcity.

Developing the biotech ideas

The team had begun by thinking about cleaned water and contamination, and ideas of water absorption and metabolism, which led to the image of the sponge. They explored the narratives of sponges absorbing and collecting water, and discovered the sponge’s ability to ‘purify’. As they observed the sponge’s properties, they began to explore how sponges could be created and designed to filter water and prevent it from being filtered again.

The team speculated on the possibility of using calcareous sponge DNA (which is very capable of filtering water and prevent it from being filtered again) in order to create an artificial ‘living’ sponge that could interact with the external environment. They looked at the context of inhabited Karst regions and how sponge technology could improve citizens’ quality of life by collecting and purifying water.

CAD Model Animation of a Street in Nanning, China showing how the ‘Living Sponge’ benefits communities regarding Climate change. Credit: Xiaoyue Ma

Nanning: a Karst landscape in south China

Karst landscapes are made up of limestone which can be worn away from the top or dissolved from a weak point inside the rock, resulting in caves, sink holes, and underground rivers. The city of Nanning in south China is in such a landscape and has significant problems with waterlogging during rainy seasons. Building a “sponge city” is an attempt by Nanning to solve waterlogging. Sponge cities use permeable pavements, water storage and roof planting methods to make the overall urban structure like a sponge that can absorb and store rainfall to reduce the risk of waterlogging.

Inspiration

The team was inspired by a range of arts and science projects from around the world. Talking with Peter Lloyd Jones led them to look at ‘Ice Stupa‘, an artificial glacier in the desert of northern India. Rachel Armstrong ‘Future Venice’ is a project about creating artificial Coral reefs), and Lab4Living’s Playponics project, led by Heath Reed, provides a way for people to interact with their environment and allow them to participate in its improvement.

Wearable Weather devices for personal water usage in the far future. Credit: Xiaoyue Ma

Final concepts

The final concepts explore wearable weather water sponges and imagine a future cityscape where the sponges adapt to weather changes. The sponge properties mean that they can not only absorb excess water but purify and filter it so that it can be stored until needed.

Sponge Packaging CAD Model. Credit: Ines de Cueto

Preparing for the summit

Working as a cross disciplinary group, the team have used their different expertise and developed effective ways of working together; as Hannah Morley says, “We have leaders, organisers, and implementers in our group.”

The team is looking forward to sharing and discussing their designs with the expert team of biological design and other finalist teams from all over the world.

BioDesign Summit

At the livestreamed summit, viewers will be able to see the students showcase their biotech projects before an international audience and panel of 60 pioneers in art, design, and technology. There will also be live Q&As with judges, and talks by keynote speakers. While this year’s event will be held online, previous summits have taken place at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Further info on The Living Sponge @ BDC Summit 2021

 
Evaluation of ‘ADHD Hero Activity Book’ paper published in Design For Health

This paper, now published in Design For Health, describes the evaluation of a prototype activity book (previously co-designed by Lab4Living researchers, families of young people with ADHD, educators and clinicians). Results indicate the activity book is an effective communication aid between young people and families. Read the paper here:

The suitability and acceptability of a co-designed prototype psychoeducational activity book for seven- to eleven-year-olds with ADHD – Powell et al.

 
Lab4Living PhD student Marika Grasso to exhibit at CHItaly 2021 “Frontiers of HCI”

Following on from a recent online residency, Marika Grasso has been accepted to exhibit in CHI Interactive Experiences at CHItaly11th – 13th July 2021. Marika is currently studying for her PhD within Lab4Living. Her exhibit “Touch/Matter Beyond Touchscreens” asks the question “Have you ever really touched your touchscreen?”

Beyond Touchscreen

The installation is a tool to reflect beyond the materiality of technology throughout the marks of touch. It focuses on the relationship between the hand and the computer and the special interaction with the screen. The small rectangular scale of the screen and its continuous presence in human life interlaces thinking and engagement in a very particular manner. The engagement with the layers composing the touchscreen is superficial, the glass layer is marked by human activity through time until the touchscreen is broken by human activity. The glass surface becomes part of the past and it is replaced, while actually, the other inside layers unbroken and soft are forgotten.

The installation is a provocation and discourse about the materiality of daily touched computers (smartphones), by decomposing and relayering and showing the untouched layers. 

The materials/layers of the smartphone are therefore organized according to the softness, elasticity, smoothness, stiffness, and thickness to expose the hidden layers of the daily touching of screens. The un-layering and exposition of all the layers such as glass film, isolation layer, ITO (transparent metal deposit), and LCD serve to look differently at the materiality of technology daily interactions.

The display of the components of the touchscreens aims to reveal more of the entanglement between the materials and the meaning they have beyond our touch and interaction. Those hidden layers also carry their own meanings, which are expressed in the size, thickness and colour, but also by the imaginary built around it, by contemporary technological culture.

CHItaly

CHItaly explores the “Frontiers of HCI” through connecting research and geographical areas, and takes place this year as a hybrid physical and digital event including workshops, presentations and Interactive Experiences.

About the artist

Marika Grasso is one of 8 PhD students who joined Lab4Living in October 2019 following the Research England award which focusses on the Future Home and 100 year life. Her research uses art practice to explore the relationship between the human condition, touch and conductive materials.

Personal website: grassomarika.academia.edu

8 new PhD students

Funded through the recent major Research England award, 8 new postgraduate students begin their studies, supervised by members of the Lab4Living team.

 
10 years of Lab4Living

The Lab celebrates 10 years with an exhibition at Sheffield Institute of Arts, in the Head Post Office building.

 
Design4Health2018: Sheffield

Back in Sheffield once more, the 5th conference themes interrogate meanings and assumptions relating to the terms ‘design’, ‘health’, ‘risk’ and ‘taboo’. Participants enjoy a candle-lit gala dinner at Sheffield cathedral.

 
Lab4Living Symposium

The Lab invites a range of researchers, practitioners and service users to join us in Sheffield for a day of seminars and workshops.

 
Head Post Office

Two years later, in 1910, the new Post Office Building is built nearby. After lying empty for more than 15 years, this Grade II listed building is given a new lease of life when it becomes the home of Sheffield Institute of Arts at Sheffield Hallam University in 2017.

 
Lab4Living at The White Building

After more than a decade, Lab4Living gets a new space inside one of Sheffield’s most interesting heritage buildings. A workshop, studio and exhibition area provide flexible space for the expanding team to work, meet, build & test, showcase work and engage with service users and the public.

 
The White Building

The White Building, designed and owned by Sheffield architects Flockton and Gibbs, is built in 1908 as part of the remodelling of Fitzalan Square in Sheffield. It has several connections to Sheffield Hallam University’s Art and Design history and later becomes home to Lab4Living. (Image: The British Newspaper Archive)

 
New proposed pathways for UTI testing in primary care settings

Project update: 9 June 2021

The design team has developed new pathways for patients to ensure more efficient testing for UTIs in primary care settings. The proposed pathways are more in line with user needs, and are based on participant insights and feedback from project participants (people who have had experience of UTI and healthcare professionals). We’ve developed a video to communicate the different pathways to project participants.

Pathways

The pathways were split into two potential locations, GP and pharmacy, with the criteria being as follows:

  1. GP non complex (females aged 16-65 with no underlying conditions)
  2. GP complex (repeat infections, underlying conditions, men and children)
  3. Pharmacy (females 16-65, no underlying conditions or repeat infections)

Animation

We’ve developed an animation video, in collaboration with Nifty Fox, that depicts clearly the different pathways.

Next steps

Next steps are to share this animation with healthcare professionals and participants to get their feedback to further inform the project. We are also developing an animation video of the final concept for the UTI testing device.

For more information, visit the UTI testing device in primary care page.

 
Relief frieze on The White Building

Architectural sculptors Tory & Sons design and produce relief friezes for the facade of the White Building, now home to Lab4Living. The friezes depicting Sheffield trades are modelled by twin brothers Albert Tory and William Tory, who were pupils at the School of Art in the 1890s,

 
Flockton and Gibbs

Future architect Edward Mitchel Gibbs (1847-1935) studies at Sheffield School of Art from 1865 – 1870. His firm, Flockton and Gibbs, later designs The White Building in Fitzalan Square, Sheffield, now home to Lab4Living.

 
Final concept for UTI testing in Primary Care project

Project update: 2 June 2021

This week the team created an animation video of the final concept for the UTI testing device in primary care settings project. Due to COVID, we have been unable to create the physical prototypes in the workshop. The animation videos provide an alternative format to enable co-design and feedback.

 

Developing the concept

We have developed this concept for the device in line with participant needs, which were identified with people who have had experience of UTI and healthcare professionals during an earlier stage of the project.

The concept features a screen tilted at a 45 degree angle which allows for viewing at a comfortable angle, with only slight neck flexion required. The entire device features no crevices, and the interface is touch screen to ensure maximum ease when cleaning. This also reduces the possibility of bacteria build up.

UTI testing concepts
UTI testing device concept with 45 degree angled touchscreen

The power button and the touchscreen buttons are sized at over 19mm so that they are easy for all adults to use. We have included a small slot at the base of the device. This will allow for sufficient ventilation of the tech when the device is in use, and also provides a hand slot to make the device easy to carry.

UTI testing concepts
UTI testing device concept

Next Steps

Next steps are to show this video to the healthcare professionals involved in this project team to get their feedback to inform the remainder of the project. We are also developing new pathways for patients to ensure more UTI efficient testing.

For more information, visit the UTI testing device in primary care page.

 
Ethical Roadmap published in Design For Health

Claire Craig, Helen Fisher and researchers from Northumbria University consider the ethical tensions and dilemmas faced in interdisciplinary research in a new journal article. The team has developed an Ethical Roadmap to support ethical practices in design and human-computer interaction (HCI) research. Available now in Design For Health:

Development of an ethical roadmap – Claire Craig et al.

 
Challenging the digital default: COVID-19 and Co-production

A chapter by Lab4Living researchers in a new publication offers some alternatives to the supposed digital dominance for co-design during the COVID-19 pandemic. The chapter is published in a new two-volume set of Rapid Responses exploring the urgent need to put co-production and participatory approaches at the heart of responses to the pandemic.

The publication will be launched at an event hosted by the Centre for Public Engagement Tuesday 22nd June.

“Challenging the digital default: in our chapter we offer a critique of an over-reliance on digital media for co-design, pointing out the exclusive nature of digital channels. We offer some alternatives that have arisen from our own practice as we explored different ways of reducing barriers to enable people to contribute to co-design.”

Dr Joe Langley, Lab4Living

“COVID co-design does not *have* to be digital” is co-written by a team of researchers from Lab4Living, the University of South Australia, and the University of York. The team have been sharing practice and building knowledge since the outbreak of the pandemic through their Co-design during COVID collaboration, exploring how to engage participants meaningfully through remote co-design. 

Background

Following an exasperated Twitter thread by researcher Joe Langley about critically challenging the “what platform should I use?” starting point for co-production during COVID, the team was invited by the editors to contribute to a new publication exploring co-production in health and social care during a pandemic. The two-volume set of Rapid Responses explores the urgent need to put co-production and participatory approaches at the heart of responses to the pandemic. It demonstrates how policymakers, health and social care practitioners, patients, service users, carers and public contributors can make this happen.

The chapter ‘COVID co-design does not *have* to be digital‘ is included in the second volume of Rapid Responses which focuses on methods and means of co-producing during a pandemic. It is available as an Open Access publication.

The editorial team has written a post for the Transforming Society blog about why the issues in the book are so important – it can be found via this link:

https://www.transformingsociety.co.uk/2021/05/24/co-production-working-together-towards-a-fairer-future/

Publication details

‘COVID co-design does not *HAVEA* to be digital’ by Joe Langley, Niki Wallace, Aaron Davis, Ian Gwilt, Sarah Knowles, Rebecca Partridge, Gemma Wheeler, and Ursula Ankeny

In: COVID-19 and Co-production in Health and Social Care Research, Policy, and Practice
Volume 2: Co-production Methods and Working Together at a Distance

Editors: Oli WilliamsDoreen TemboJosephine OclooMeerat KaurGary HickeyMichelle Farr and Peter Beresford

ISBN: 978-1447361794

Imprint: Policy Press

Page count: 160 pages

A launch event will hosted by the Centre for Public Engagement online at 16:00-17:15 Tues 22 June 2021.
Book free place at launch.

 
Two PhD Studentships in Lab4Living

Two Lab4Living studentship projects plus Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) studentships for postgraduate research students in the Art, Design & Media Research Centre now advertised.

CCRI Impact Blog: PhD Studentship Opportunities in CCRI

 
Paul Chamberlain exhibits new collection at Venice Biennial Architecture exhibition

Conversation Piece

Paul Chamberlain (Lab4Living) is exhibiting a new collection of work at Venice Biennial Architecture exhibition “Time Space Existence” which opens 22 May 2021 and runs until 21 November 2021.

The traditional structures of our every-day life and the spaces we inhabit are being challenged. Increased life expectancy, a global pandemic and technology pervading every aspect of our lives is blurring the boundaries of domesticity and work life, while spaces within the home become less delineated.

Through this collection of work Paul challenges traditional furniture typologies and morphs archetypal forms to create hybrid ambiguous artefacts that reflect the domestic quotidian. The work is part of a broader Lab4Living research enquiry funded through Research England’s Expanding Excellence in England Programme that explores the role of Design in the reconceptualisation of the 100-year life.

Exhibition: “Time Space Existence” 
Location: Palazzo Bembo, Palazzo Mora and Marinaressa Gardens, Venice, Italy
Organisers: European Cultural Centre – Italy
Dates: May 22nd – November 21st 2021
Website: https://ecc-italy.eu/exhibitions/upcoming

 
War and Medicine

Prof David Cotterrell’s photographic & written accounts of the militarised healthcare pathway informs development of new training materials for personnel going into combat zones.

 
Art & Design research rated highly

50% of SHU’s A&D research rated internationally excellent or world leading, including Chamberlain’s Medical Connectors, TacTile Sounds, Dulake’s visualising Nanotechnology, and Yoxall’s improving Packaging Openability.

 
RAE2001

Art & Design performs strongly in the 2001 UK research assessment exercise. 5* rated research includes Chamberlain’s TacTile Sounds vibro-sound product development for clinical use.

 
Design Futures accredited as a CIC

As a result of its strengths in research and knowledge transfer, Design Futures is accredited by the EU as a Centre of Industrial Collaboration (CIC) to support regional regeneration. It is the only non-STEM CIC status granted.

 
Design Futures

A commercially focused product & packaging design consultancy group, the Advanced Product Development Centre, now known as Design Futures, is developed by the ADRC in collaboration with Uni of Sheffield to support the regeneration of the Sheffield sub region.

 
24-Hr Design Challenge

Kyoto DesignLab‘s Julia Cassim runs a 24-Hour participatory Design Challenge during the Design4Health2013 conference.

 
Noemie Soula presents Handle (me) with care at SDEA Theatre Arts Conference

Noémie Soula presents her art research project ‘Handle (me) with care’ at the forthcoming SDEA Theatre Arts Conference in May. The project explores and re-imagines the relationship between bedridden patients and their caregivers during dressing rituals. 

The presentation will focus on how the use of art-based methods – such as dance and textile creations – in this inquiry leads to a better understanding of this highly choreographic care. It will also emphasize how creative practices can infiltrate and challenge other disciplines and research ground to generate new knowledge. 

The SDEA Theatre Arts Conference 2021 is organised by Singapore Drama Educators Association (SDEA). SDEA is a not-for-profit organisation set up by artists and drama educators which advocates for the practice and value of drama and theatre in performance, education and community.

The conference is attended by performance, drama, theatre artists and educators. This year’s event is fully online and is themed Creative Disruption: Exploring New Ground. Join from 22 -30 May 2021 to see Noemi’s work!

About the Artist

Noémie Soula is a French artist who joined Lab4Living as a research assistant in 2020. Her practice and research interests sit at the crossroad between art and science, looking at what defines or even redefines humankind. This piece of work is part of the research focus on the 100-year life and the Future Home.

 
Kaisu Koski and Peter Lloyd Jones Talking BIO·FICTION

Kaisu Koski and Peter Lloyd Jones will host an online discussion session as part of BIOART Society‘s Talking BIO·FICTION in April.

As part of the BIO·FICTION Shorts season (a touring collection of short films), Kaisu Koski and Peter Lloyd Jones will host a discussion session on 14th April 2021. The season of films explore the theme of Futurebody and delve into neurotechnology. This session will discuss films Paramusical EnsembleErase Love, and Adam & Eve MK II.

Bioart Society is a Helsinki-based association developing, producing and facilitating activities around art and natural sciences with an emphasis on biology, ecology and life sciences. It runs SOLU Space, an artistic laboratory and platform for art, science and society. Bioart Society is committed to supporting bioart and biohacking practices through its programme of events.

Date: 14 April 2021, 19–21h (Finnish time, UTC+2) 
Location: Online
Info: Talking BIO·FICTION at BIOART Society

 
Paul Chamberlain and Nick Dulake to present NESTORE work at final workshop

Paul Chamberlain will be presenting the work of the Lab4Living team on the NESTORE project alongside the 16 European project partners at an online event on the 27th February to mark the end of the project.

NESTORE final workshop

Designers, developers, users, public authorities and businesses will come together at the final event to explore the lessons learnt in more than three years of activity on project called NESTORE (Novel Empowering Solutions and Technology for Older people to Retain Everyday life activities). They will exchange the knowledge built in relation to co-design, technology and user experience.

Paul Chamberlain, Claire Craig and Nick Dulake have been involved in the three year project, funded through the EU H2020 programme. Chamberlain et al. have been responsible for leading the co-design that has informed the development of an extensive system that supports health and wellbeing through the four domains of physical, nutritional, cognitive and social.

One of the tangible elements of the NESTORE interface

Co-design

The L4L team has engaged over 200 participants in co-design activities in the UK, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands, and worked in close collaboration with technical partners in Switzerland.

The project has faced challenges engaging with older communities through recent restrictions imposed by COVID but recent events have highlighted the importance of role of technology in supporting wellbeing.

The outcomes of the project presents creative methods for co-design and highlight the value of engaging users in the process. Useful insights have emerged for the development of future systems.

NESTORE project partners
Claire and Paul (centre) with NESTORE project partners at Milano Politecnico

 
Researcher Blog: Paul Emmerson

We introduce a series of researcher blogs written by Lab4Living staff and postgraduate students in which they reflect on their work, studies, events and trips.
In this first blog, researcher Paul Emmerson writes about his recent participation in an online dialogue organised for Sheffield Hallam University staff and students.

Sustainability Challenges for Moving to A Low Carbon Economy and Society

On Wednesday, 24th February 2021 I was pleased to attend, as a discussant, SHU’s Research Institute Dialogue online event introducing diverse academic expertise exploring: “Sustainability Challenges for Moving to A Low Carbon Economy and Society.” A cohort of colleagues engaged the sixty strong viewers with their research and insight. I note several discussions that caught my attention. Fiery thoughts encapsulated Dr Robin Smith’s approach. His study of nuclear reactions within stars ignited his case for fission and fusion nuclear power as decarbonising technologies to energise our industries and heat our homes. But, as Robin sagely noted, these ideas have technical difficulties and societal challenges ahead.

A cohort of colleagues engaged the sixty strong viewers with their research and insight. I note several discussions that caught my attention. Fiery thoughts encapsulated Dr Robin Smith’s approach. His study of nuclear reactions within stars ignited his case for fission and fusion nuclear power as decarbonising technologies to energise our industries and heat our homes. But, as Robin sagely noted, these ideas have technical difficulties and societal challenges ahead.

A chemist, whose past explored studying carbon arising in the age of dinosaurs, Dr Rachel Schwartz-Narbonne spoke of how her new research employs the remarkable characteristics of microbes. She enlists their help to create renewable biogas energy and other materials from our endless supply of wastewater. Biogas power from the “cleaning” of waste is surely a future development we can support.

Elsewhere, Dr Steve Parkes drew attention to the social inequalities of transportation and his promotion of active travel within Sheffield as a carbon-reducing practice we can all partake in while improving our wellbeing. In the future, he argues autonomous vehicles also hold the potential to support the creation of a low carbon economy. And, hopefully, if electrically powered, redress the troubling issue of car emissions within inner cities.

Photo by ETA+ on Unsplash
Photo by ETA+ on Unsplash

Dr Hywel Jones, a material scientist, spoke of the problematics of recycling. With mobile phones a global phenomenon containing over 45 elements, it remains that reclamation is limited to just over twenty. Moreover, billions remain “hiding” in our cupboards! Hywel’s wise position is to questions how we use materials more efficiently and make our phones last longer while offering the same performance. To advance this discourse, he engages the public in recycling and informational events to help drive behavioural change.

Closest to my practice of design for wellbeing and sustainability is the research of Dr Cristina Cerulli. An architect, Cristina’s work promotes community involvement in designing sustainable focused interventions that challenge the status quo. This stance brings her ethical commitment towards creating a more just society to the fore within her practice.

The presentations highlight SHU’s reach and depth of disciplinary insight capable of helping to address the sustainability challenge and move to a low carbon economy. But to my mind, they mainly agreed with what I believe is today’s dominant worldview. A belief presented by governments, industries and academics. One of how technological innovation will save the day and enable low carbon economies. This is a dangerous position.

 

Robin’s thinking, I believe, represents the “grandest” of such a technology-led intervention to sustainability. Such ideas ought not to be dismissed. Indeed, they will likely play an essential future role. However, the worldview perspective they are typically presented from represents a technological solutions approach that has proven problematic since such thinking arose during the industrial revolution. Centuries-old studies inform how technological innovations delivering transformative efficiency gains result in price reductions. These price reductions drive demand that in turn drives consumption. As an everyday example, since the switch from using baths to water-saving showers, our water usage in the UK over the last 25 years has increased by 50% (Environment Agency 2014).

Consequently, as widely discussed in economics for sustainability, and design for sustainability literature, efficiency alone is not the solution. Sustainability, encompassing the question of how we realise a low carbon economy, fundamentally requires comprehending our sufficient needs from the perspective of social practices (Shove 2011). 

Such comprehension of sufficiency, in my view, requires the formation of a new culture. A culture that builds on the existing social movement practices for sustainability and social equality movements to support the broad critical engagement of citizens as ongoing participants in the steer of their community towards sustainability. 

We know citizen endeavour to be sustainable. However, as my question to the panel posed, we need to research: “how do we democratise, articulate, and create the enabling conditions that may scale nationally for Sheffield’s citizen’s ongoing life-centred practice of sustainability?” Only when the enabling conditions, the realising of new civics infrastructures that support citizens in shaping their everyday practice of sustainability and wellbeing, with a cultural informational focus (Sen 2009) of delivering the ongoing value of fairness between citizens, is a path depicting a globally sustainable future likely to become visible. SHU appears well-placed to enable this research. Its impressive academics, with their combined expertise and energy, appear ready to empower citizens to radically challenge their ways of living.

References

Environment Agency. (2014). Environment Agency – Save Water. Retrieved 21 March 2014, from http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/beinggreen/117266.aspx

Sen, A. (2009). The Idea of Justice. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Shove, E. (2011). Science and Technology Select Committee Behaviour Change (Cabinet Office, Department of Education and the Government Economic and Social Research Team, Ed.). House of Lords. http://www.parliament.uk/documents/lords-committees/science-technology/behaviourchange/BCOralandWrittenEvCompiled180711.pdf

About the Researcher

Paul Emmerson‘s practice seeks to resolve the synthesis of his interests in social innovation, sustainability and design for health and wellbeing across projects that involve product and service design alongside business model innovation.

 
Stainless steel scalpels

Building on a 1915 design patented in the USA by Morgan Parker, Sheffield-based Swann-Morton become world leading manufacturers of two piece stainless steel surgical scalpels.

 
Best performance yet in UK REF

81% of SHU’s Art & Design submitted work, which includes L4L, is judged world leading or internationally excellent in 2014 research excellence assessment. Art and Design research is ranked 2nd in modern universities and in top ten of all UK universities.

 
New book launched to provide support for people recently diagnosed with dementia

 
Sheffield Hallam researchers install first of its kind energy harnessing playground in India

 
‘Discovering Dementia’ book launch

 
Design For Health journal launched

Design For Health, published by Taylor & Francis Online, is launched in Rome. It is led by Lab4Living and an Editorial board drawn from across the world.

 
Design4Health2015 conference

The 3rd conference in Sheffield welcomes 177 delegates. 90 papers, an exhibition and – for the first time – posters respond to the theme Synergies of Practice. The 24-Hr Design Challenge explores the theme of Parkinson’s disease.

 
Sheffield School of Art

By the 1850s Sheffield School of Design had grown to around 1,000 students and changed our name to Sheffield School of Art. At the Great Exhibition, we were the most successful art and design school in the country, with Sheffield students winning four gold medals – no other school won any.

The beginnings of design and health

Leonardo da Vinci uses drawing to interrogate and build knowledge of anatomy

Sheffield School of Design

Sheffield School of Design was founded to provide skilled designers to support Britain’s industry.

Art and design education supports industry

A UK government select committee is appointed to look at increasing fine art and design education to support industry.

 
‘Playponics’ pilot playground installed in Uttar Pradesh, India

 
UTI testing in Primary Care project: Involving participants through non-digital means

Project update: 5 Jan 2021

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, face-to-face workshops to understand user thoughts on the proposed devices and pathways for the have not been possible for the UTI testing project. Lab4Living researchers have been exploring non-digital means of engaging participants meaningfully through remote co-design (see Co-design during COVID-19). Therefore, the UTI testing project team has developed a booklet of activities. We printed and sent out to all patient representatives in November 2020.

The project looks at devices for rapid testing of urinary tract infections in primary care settings (e.g. GP surgeries). The booklet activities are centred around scoping out possible pathways e.g. understanding peoples preferences around timings and methods of receiving information and understanding device requirements.

Completed booklets from patient representatives

Booklet format

This format has enabled participants (who are taking part as they have had experience of UTI) to be actively involved in the design process from the comfort of their own homes. By using a booklet format, participants had the time and space to work through the different activities without feeling pressured or put on the spot. Participants filled out and posted the booklet back to the team, and we have been collating their insights.

Key insights

Remote co-design: booklet of activities for the UTI testing project
Remote co-design: booklet of activities for the UTI testing project

Key insights for the device included a preference for a smaller size, and issues around privacy of information in terms of screen display. In terms of the pathway, participants emphasised the information they would want to know in the result of a negative test. For example, what else could symptoms mean? What might worrying symptoms be? What are the next steps? The devices and pathways will be further developed based on these insights. The feedback has been valuable, and has helped the team to develop further the device and possible pathway.

Next steps

The team is now working towards developing some prototypes and exploring possible pathways that embody the user needs, to be ready for summer 2021 for further feedback.

For more information, visit the UTI testing device in primary care page.

 
LAB4LIVING NEWS ARCHIVE

Lab4living news archive on the CCRI Impact blog at Sheffield Hallam University
Lab4Living is one of four research centres which make up the Culture and Creativity Research Institute (CCRI), Sheffield Hallam University’s largest and highest rated community of researchers.
The CCRI Impact blog was set up in 2015 to showcase research and publications from its research community. All news items relating to Lab4Living dating from 2015 to 2021 can be found on the blog’s Lab4Living News Archive.

 
Art & Design Research Centre founded at SHU

A new research centre is founded at Sheffield Hallam University by Prof Jim Roddis, providing a catalyst for creative practice based research and knowledge transfer.

 
Former student pioneers art therapy in Sheffield

After volunteering during WWI, former Sheffield Art School student Annie Bindon Carter starts a company helping men severely disabled in the war to produce painted fabrics, sold around the country. An early example of art therapy, the business employs 70 ex-servicemen.

 
1st practice-led PhD

The first practice-led design PhD at SHU is awarded to Graham Whiteley for his research: “An Articulated Skeletal Analogy of the Human Upper Limb”.

 
A rebranding exercise

After more than 10 years, we undergo a rebrand.

 
Research England Award

In recognition of its track record in design-led research, Lab4Living receives £4m funding award from Research England’s Expanding Excellence in England (E3) fund to support strategic research into the 100-year life and the Future Home.

 
Journeying Through Dementia

 
2nd Design4Health conference

150 delegates from 16 countries attend the second conference in Sheffield. The themes are invention, adoption and diffusion.

 
Design4Health17: Melbourne

Hosted at the famous Melbourne Cricket Club by Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia.

 
Joe Langley NIHR Knowledge Mobilisation Fellowship

Joe Langley’s NIHR Knowledge Mobilisation Fellowship is the first to be awarded to a researcher from outside the health disciplines. The fellowship explores the added value of design and making in the context of co-produced research, seeding several ongoing projects.

 
AHRC Network Award

A consortium led by L4L publishes an expert-led review of the extent of the art of design theory and practice in health and social care.

 
European Network of Living Labs

We’re awarded Membership of ENoL and are one of the longest established living labs in Europe.

 
TacMap

The development of an iconic tactile language for use in the production of tactile maps led to Lab4Living’s first Spin Out Company

 
1st European Design4Health Conference

Launched in the Art & Design Research Centre and Sheffield Institute of Arts Gallery at Sheffield Hallam University in July 2011.

 
Future Bathroom

EPSRC-funded project outcomes are awarded ‘Most Innovative Design’ in 2017 by the Over 50s Housing Association, UK.

 
Patented Medical Connection System

Paul Chamberlain brings new approaches to medical drug delivery connectors, using a haptic/cognitive approach to reduce problems of mismatching which could lead to fatal accidents. Funded by UK Health Technology Device Agency

 
Lab4Living

Lab4Living is launched as a multidisciplinary research initiative bringing together expertise from SHU’s art & design and health & wellbeing research communities, and industrial design consultancy Design Futures.

 
Nurse Communication System – Mediplan

Commercial production of a new hospital communication system begins, the first R&D project with medical equipment manufacturer Mediplan. Through its long-term collaboration with Design Futures researchers, Mediplan has successfully adopted design at a strategic level.

 
TacTile Sounds

Millennium Product Award winning TacTile sounds system, a modular vibro-acoustic furniture system, is an early example of using design and creative practice to understand complex user needs.

 
Life Café

Kits developed and produced by Lab4Living and Design Futures Packaging are now available to purchase via Marie Curie.

 
PAUL CHAMBERLAIN AND CLAIRE CRAIG TO GIVE KEYNOTES AT DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2018

During Dutch Design Week 2018Creative Industries Fund NL and Waag are organising the Designing a Community of Care: From creative research to practice network meeting, in association with the Aedes-Actiz Knowledge Centre for Housing, Care and Welfare and the Who Cares team. Paul and Claire will give a keynote exploring the role of design and creative practice in understanding and tackling the challenges of an ageing population.

In the Netherlands a care reinvention is happening. An ageing population, decentralisation and technological advances are making new demands on the provision of care in communities. Creative Industries Fund NL and Waag believe in the power of design’s contribution to this process of transition within care in the community.

Designing a Community of Care
The reason for this meeting is the Open Call: Designing a Community of Care, which was issued by the Fund in the spring of 2018. Thirteen projects have been initiated, in which designers are tackling changes to care in the community in conjunction with municipal services, care providers and housing corporations. You can find further information via this link (Dutch only).

Keynote speakers 

Professor Paul Chamberlain – Design Director of Lab4Living at Sheffield Hallam University

Dr Claire Craig – Health Director of Lab4Living at Sheffield Hallam University

Good design can mean a lot for society, but how can design practices and processes help to tackle the challenges we are facing in the 21st century? Paul Chamberlain argues that design is as much about the definition of the question as it is about providing an answer, and that interdisciplinary collaboration is the starting point for new creative possibilities. In Claire Craig’s former role as an occupational therapist she gained experience in the advancement of the wellbeing of the elderly, and she believes that design plays a pivotal role in this field.

Designing a Community of Care: From creative research to practice
Monday 22 October 2018, 1PM – 5PM
Innovation Powerhouse (Strijp-T), Zwaanstraat 31a, Eindhoven

Chronic Health exhibition
The Embassy of Health is an initiative of Waag, VanBerlo, Philips, Máxima Medical Centre, U Create and the Dutch Design Foundation. The ‘Chronic Health’ exhibition reveals how these organisations are jointly shaping care and how care products or services are not autonomous, but interact within a complex care environment. The exhibition immerses visitors in an interactive environment and allows them to experience the current and prospective role of design for (health)care: now, as well as in the immediate and more distant future.

Professor Paul Chamberlain is a Professor of Design, Co-Director of C3RI at Sheffield Hallam University, Head of the Art & Design Research Centre and Co-Director of Lab4Living.

Claire Craig is Reader in Design and Creative Practice in Health in the Art & Design Research Centre (ADRC) and Co-Director of the interdisciplinary research group Lab4Living. Claire’s research focuses on the role of creative practices in improving quality of life and well-being for people living with dementia.

Photo above: Sander van Wettum.

 
Head Up

The neck support collar goes into production at partner healthcare company, Talarmade.

 
Exhibition in a Box

‘exhibition in a box’ is developed as a tool to engage communities in co-creative activities, informing much subsequent Lab4Living work.

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Featured Projects

 

Feeling of Wellbeing

Read more
 

Protected: Creative Practices & Coproduction: a Special Issue for ‘Evidence & Policy’

Read more
 

Festival of Design4Health

Read more
 

Nano BioGas: sustainable and renewable energy

Read more

Team member block

 

Prof Paul Chamberlain

Co-Director

View Paul’s bio

 

Prof Peter Lloyd Jones

Professor of Design

View Peter’s bio

 

Prof Claire Craig

Co-Director

View Claire’s bio

Kaisu Koski 

Dr Kaisu Koski

Associate Professor of Art and Design

View Kaisu’s bio

 

Dr Joseph Langley

Principal Research Fellow

View Joe’s bio
Micheal Tan Koon Boon 

Dr Michael Koon Boon Tan

Associate Professor of Art and Design

View Michael’s bio

 

Bethany Guy

Lab4Living Administrator lab4living@shu.ac.uk
 

Heath Reed

Principal Researcher

View Heath’s bio
 

Kirsty Christer

Communications and Events Officer

View Kirsty’s bio

 

Julie Roe

Project Manager

View Julie’s bio

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Maecenas tincidunt ex in viverra commodo. Mauris sit amet faucibus lacus. Nulla et finibus mauris. Ut posuere laoreet orci eu luctus. Aliquam erat volutpat. Cras malesuada diam a sem scelerisque vehicula. Ut a ante vitae turpis scelerisque cursus ut a sapien. Nullam nec molestie orci, ultrices venenatis enim. Nunc mauris est, tempor sed arcu non, posuere suscipit magna.

Integer placerat hendrerit nibh non pulvinar. Proin in tincidunt nisl. Nunc a lobortis ipsum. In dignissim ac velit vitae mollis. Suspendisse quis lectus a est pulvinar commodo in ac eros. Donec rutrum iaculis malesuada. Integer finibus arcu diam, nec dignissim libero laoreet sit amet. Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Sed ac dui ac leo luctus pulvinar eu a odio. Ut euismod ligula eu nisl convallis posuere. Duis tempor augue odio, sed pulvinar sem bibendum in. Nam eleifend sodales tellus vel vestibulum. Quisque vitae semper ipsum.

Pellentesque ut condimentum ante, sed gravida nunc. Aliquam fringilla, mauris sed ornare aliquam, quam eros ullamcorper nulla, eget consectetur risus ipsum eu metus. Orci varius natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Nulla eleifend nulla vel dolor hendrerit scelerisque. Cras a risus non metus efficitur rhoncus. Nullam id lectus augue. Maecenas eleifend velit nulla, ut aliquam leo dignissim sit amet. Donec eu mi pretium, aliquam nunc et, faucibus odio.

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